The Christian life begins and ends as we gather together to receive God’s gifts of forgiveness, life, and salvation in weekly worship. Whether you’re a service planner, worship leader, or hymn lover, you’ll sing for joy at these music posts.
  1. Hymn of the Month: From God Can Nothing Move Me

    The Hymn of Month is “From God Can Nothing Move Me” (LSB713). It is set to the tune VON GOTT WILL ICH NICHT LASSEN. This is probably the most well-known hymn of Ludwig Helmbold, a German philosophy professor and poet of Lutheran hymns. It was written for friends fleeing the 1563 plague in Erfurt to comfort them on their journey. Johann Sebastian Bach used several of Helmbold’s hymn texts in his cantatas, and stanza five of Von Gott Will Ich Nicht Lassenappears in Bach’s O heilges Geist-und Wasserbad(O holy bath of Spirit and Water).

  2. Three Thanksgiving Hymn Histories: Companion to the Hymns

    November is a time of thanksgiving. We reflect and give thanks for everything that God has provided for us physically, spiritually, and emotionally. During this month, many churches, perhaps even your church, sing hymns of thanksgiving each Sunday. If you’re curious about the backstory and historical context of thanksgiving hymns (or any other hymn!), LSB: Companion to the Hymns is a great resource. To illustrate, we’ve picked three of these hymns and their histories to share in-depth.

  3. Music of the Month: Festival Gloria

    Description

    Jacob B. Weber has composed a thrilling Gloria for SATB, organ, and brass quartet. Featuring joyous symphonic writing, the piece begins with a fanfare interplay between brass and organ, leading directly into angelic strains of “Gloria in excelsis Deo!” Moments of warm, rich choral writing complement the text. Set entirely in Latin, this setting can be a featured addition to any high school or college Christmas concert, or, when appropriate, a festival Divine Service setting during the Church Year.

  4. Three Hymn Recommendations for Reformation Day

    On Reformation Day, October 31, we celebrate Martin Luther and the nailing of the Ninety-Five Theses to the Castle Church doors in Wittenberg. This event also led to the eventual creation of the Lutheran Church.

  5. Train Students to Sing Hymns Artfully