The Christian life begins and ends as we gather together to receive God’s gifts of forgiveness, life, and salvation in weekly worship. Whether you’re a service planner, worship leader, or hymn lover, you’ll sing for joy at these music posts.
  1. Technology and Church Music

    We live in a world dominated by digital technology—technology that majorly affects our modern musical world. Although digital technology can offer us a wealth of music we might otherwise not have access to, digital recordings lack the inherent risk of live performance—a risk that lends live performances a certain sense of humanity. This humanity reflects the reality of our lives, including the reality of salvation through Christ. Although digital technology in the musical world is a great gift, it is a worthy endeavor to continue to pursue live musical performances in order to experience the wonder and beauty of music that we must take as is in all its imperfection.

  2. Music Evolving through the Reformation

    This blog post has been adapted from an article that appears inLutheranism 101: Third Edition. Read the first part of the articlehere.

  3. Music of the Month: Preludes on Five Hymns of Martin Luther

    Bret A. Heim has crafted new settings based on five of Martin Luther's hymns:  GOTT DER VATER, WOHN UNS BEI; JESUS CHRISTUS, UNSER HEILAND; a cantilena and toccata on NUN BITTEN WIR; NUN FREUT EUCH; and a delightful triptych on NUN KOMM, DER HEIDEN HEILAND. These attractive settings will be a wonderful addition to the organist’s library.

  4. The Importance of Movement in the Divine Service

    As anyone who spends time around kids can attest, children love to move. In fact, it is often difficult to get them to sit still, and many teachers know how beneficial it is to plan lessons in which children can move their bodies while still learning. Like many things, this characteristic of children speaks truth about human beings in general: we are made to move.

  5. Music of the Month: Praetorius Chorales for SAB Choir

    This three-volume set edited by William Braun includes the SAB chorale settings of Michael Praetorius, making this collection accessible to most choirs. The settings may be used as a complete selection by the choir, as an anthem, or in alteration with the congregation for the Hymn of the Day.